Tag Archives: experimental

7 H.Target – 0.00 Apocalypse

This is a guest post written by reviewer Akerfeldt_Fanboi, and is re-blogged from http://www.metal-archives.com/.

7 H. Target‘s 2012 full-length Fast-Slow Demolition was a refreshing breeze in the stagnate climate of slamming brutal death metal. Each track was an overwhelming chaos of modern Malignancy mixed with a healthy dose of groove and later drenched in Japanese body-horror references, leaving a disgusting record that backed up its slam with proper death metal.
0.00 Apocalypse 
,while still having an equally nonsensical title, pushes the band away from the sampling and body-horror from the debut into a hellish cyber post-apocalypse that seems to move with a thematic continuity between the records.

Likewise, the music evolves. The maelstrom of riffs and breakdowns are dismembered, cauterized, and sewn back together with mechanical precision here – though not to say the debut was incredibly sloppy or amateurish by any degree. Here, however, the performance is nearly robotic in its precision and power. Even with their technical prowess, one of the most impressive aspects of the band was that they reserved their slower moments and slams for special occasions, leaving them for the most climactic points of their career (i.e. “Hara-Kiri Torture Mechanism”) and letting the momentum of that apex propel the rest of the music into a blistering finale. Continuing in that trend, “Technofetishist” represents that same turning point of the album where the nearly nonstop ferocity of the previous tracks grinds to a halt for a grooving junction before turning the dial back up immediately. But this rendition is more intense, less organically disturbing with more imagery of mechanical halls of torture and cybernetic mayhem.

The songs themselves are just that: songs. Unlike many of their peers, this Russian trio writes tunes that have a cohesive feel and flow and stick to your brain for weeks on end and rarely leave without a lasting impression. I know I was desperately trying to play the opening riff of “Meatball Machine Story” for the first few days this album was in my hands. The squeal of harmonics and low-end rumbling all attributes to the inorganic material this album tries to fuse itself with, and in the process the listener is left scarred by the surgeries and attempts at grotesque combinations. These guys know how they want to sound, how pitch-perfect the placement of each groove is, and by God do they execute that idea with a pristine finish.

Every passage strikes the cold, lifeless tone in each slam and half-time before spitting out a stream of brutal death metal. Crunchy, roaring death metal abounds on this album with frequent dips into blasting insanity and endless tremolo that neatly wraps the musical package together into something special. As usual, the drumming of Mikhail is one of the highlights here, with each massive beat of the snare pulling the pieces of each song together into a cohesive whole. The tone of the album is phenomenal, with a clear production that suits the style of the music to the point where it mimics the progression of the band’s lyrical content and concept of a transhumanist future. This, to them, is a vile, detestable future for humanity – or at least the incredible (and sometimes incredibly indecipherable) situations in the songs point to this. For instance “S-94” is a tale of a wasteland of sex addicts preying on any and all women they come across, even ending in a horrible sampled audio at the end with somber music devolving into noise and ending with sadistic laughter.

With every song the band submits the listener to a barrage of hyper-demented slam with an unforgettable twist of production and song-writing quality. They have a keen eye on their direction, clearly, and somehow pull off this brand of metal without forgoing the structure, composition, and quality of their music. From paper to performance, this album is a definite must-buy for any fanatics of the genre and anyone looking to take the final step to total assimilation.

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